Posted by: hesterkelly1987 | January 21, 2011

Harmattan Time!

By Hester Kelly

It’s Harmattan season in Ghana! The sky has taken on a  dusty haze(due to the wind blowing down from the Sahara),making the horizon disappear and the locals complain that it is cold! Cold?! It is still about 27 degrees and humid! So after closing for 2 weeks over Christmas ( I went to Burkina Faso) things are back in full swing at the HRAC. I am currently case managing about 10 clients and trying to do some work on my research project- the right to health in Ghana. The right to health is not explicitly mentioned in the Ghanaian Constitution however there are some sections that mention  health. I am collecting cases from the Supreme Court which I will then put in a report for the United Nations.

Also , one of the AYAD volunteers here has taken on the challenge of creating the fist HRAC magazine. The inaugural issue is going to focus on  gender and I hope to contribute an article on Female Genital Mutilation in Ghana. Although Ghana has criminalised FGM , it is still quite prevalent in the north of the country , especially in the communities on the border with Burkina Faso.

In other, more social news , I managed  to secure an invitation to the Australia Day Reception at the Australian High Commission. It was very exciting because Kevin Rudd was going to attend,  which lead to a week long dilemma about what I was going to wear!However, due to the floods in Queensland and his leg infection, we have been told he is unable to attend, which is  a touch disappointing. Especially  because  when I told my mother about Kevin Rudd coming she must have misheard, so  I later got emails from friends telling me my mother had told the whole town I had had lunch in Ghana with Kevin Rudd.


Responses

  1. I kind of loved this post. The Kevin Rudd/mother situation sounds exactly like my mother. Sounds like an awesome Australia Day. Vanessa and I went to our friend’s house, who is Canadian. She hosted an Australia Day party for us, where some of the South Africans taught us their dances, and we taught them the nutbush!


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